On March 29, 1996 the Health Care Consent Act (HCCA) replaced the Consent to Treatment Act when the Advocacy, Consent and Substitute Decisions Statute Law Amendment Act was brought into force. At the same time, the Advocacy Act was repealed and the Substitute Decisions Act was amended.

As a medical radiation technologist (MRT) you are considered a health practitioner for the purposes of the HCCA and need to be familiar with its requirements. This Act applies to most treatments wherever they are provided and to most of the regulated health professions.

As its central principle, the HCCA provides that a health practitioner who proposes a treatment to a person shall not administer the treatment and shall take reasonable steps to ensure that it is not administered unless he or she believes that the person is :

  • Capable with respect to the treatment, and has given consent; or
  • Incapable with respect to the treatment, and another person has given consent in accordance with the HCCA

This means that any health practitioner who proposes a treatment to a person must not administer the treatment, and must take reasonable steps to ensure that the treatment is not done unless a valid consent has been given.

 

View the CMRTO publication
 What you must know about... health care consent act